Two e-book bargains (Greenwood and Chevalier)

 Girl with a Pearl Earring, The by [Chevalier, Tracy]

These two very different book bargains feature female protagonists as they deal with their lives in their historical periods.

Cocaine Blues is the first novel in the Phrynne Fisher series of mysteries.  The books are set in Australia in the 1920s.  Phrynne is an independent woman who solves cases with the help of a cast of repeating characters.  The books are fun.  Note:  the novels were made into a mystery series that I think might still be available through Acorn TV.  The TV series was good escapist fun.

From Publishers Weekly

The growing American audience for Phryne Fisher, Australian author Greenwood’s independent 1920s female sleuth, will be delighted that her diverting first mystery is finally available in the U.S. Fisher’s off-the-cuff solving of a high society jewel theft leads her to her first professional engagement when a witness to her brilliance asks her to investigate a possible poisoning-in-progress. The detective’s admirable willingness to intervene to help those in distress involves her in a variety of other puzzles, including identifying the King of Snow, who has taken over the Melbourne drug trade. Many of the members of Fisher’s entourage familiar from later novels make their debuts as well.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Has everyone read Girl with a Pearl Earring by now?  If, by some chance, you missed the novel now is your chance.  It richly and luminously describes its time and place.  Vermeer and his maid are brought vividly to life.  This is a quiet novel but a good one.

From Publishers Weekly

The scant confirmed facts about the life of Vermeer, and the relative paucity of his masterworks, continues to be provoke to the literary imagination, as witnessed by this third fine fictional work on the Dutch artist in the space of 13 months. Not as erotic or as deviously suspenseful as Katharine Weber’s The Music Lesson, or as original in conception as Susan Vreeland’s interlinked short stories, Girl in Hyacinth Blue, Chevalier’s first novel succeeds on its own merits. Through the eyes of its protagonist, the modest daughter of a tile maker who in 1664 is forced to work as a maid in the Vermeer household because her father has gone blind, Chevalier presents a marvelously textured picture of 17th-century Delft. The physical appearance of the city is clearly delineated, as is its rigidly defined class system, the grinding poverty of the working people and the prejudice against Catholics among the Protestant majority. From the very first, 16-year-old narrator Griet establishes herself as a keen observer who sees the world in sensuous images, expressed in precise and luminous prose. Through her vision, the personalities of coolly distant Vermeer, his emotionally volatile wife, Catharina, his sharp-eyed and benevolently powerful mother-in-law, Maria Thins, and his increasing brood of children are traced with subtle shading, and the strains and jealousies within the household potently conveyed. With equal skill, Chevalier describes the components of a painting: how colors are mixed from apothecary materials, how the composition of a work is achieved with painstaking care. She also excels in conveying the inflexible class system, making it clear that to members of the wealthy elite, every member of the servant class is expendable. Griet is almost ruined when Vermeer, impressed by her instinctive grasp of color and composition, secretly makes her his assistant, and later demands that she pose for him wearing Catharina’s pearl earrings. While Chevalier develops the tension of this situation with skill, several other devices threaten to rob the narrative of its credibility. Griet’s ability to suggest to Vermeer how to improve a painting demands one stretch of the reader’s imagination. And Vermeer’s acknowledgment of his debt to her, revealed in the denouement, is a blatant nod to sentimentality. Still, this is a completely absorbing story with enough historical authenticity and artistic intuition to mark Chevalier as a talented newcomer to the literary scene. Agent, Deborah Schneider.
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.
So…if you are looking for reading for the holiday weekend, consider these.

3 thoughts on “Two e-book bargains (Greenwood and Chevalier)

  1. Love Kerry Greenwood’s work but Phryne Fisher is her best! I thought Girl With A Pearl Earring was good historical fiction but lacked conviction, petering away at the end. Jessie Burton’s The Miniaturist is much the same, a nebulous storyline.

    Like

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