Recently published: All Ways Family by Noemí Fernández Selva

Adults often feel flummoxed when the time comes to talk to children about “how babies are made.” This book with its appealing multicultural illustrations helps come to the rescue.

All Ways Family is geared towards six to ten year olds, although I would just recommend this as a guideline. The book’s approach is to have children talk about their families. Readers starts with Paula, who goes to see the ultrasound with her heterosexual parents. When Paula returns to school with the ultrasound, her teacher talks to the class about reproduction.

This book is very inclusive. The classmates go on to hear from children where there was assisted reproduction and families formed by adoption.

The book provides an introduction to talking about “All Ways” families may be formed. It can help adults to begin a discussion with children who are at that age where adults need to begin this conversation.

Many thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for this book ine exchange for an honest review.

Murder at the Mena House by Erica Ruth Neubauer

They say that you can’t judge a book by its cover but I have to say that, as soon as I saw this one, the visual appeal made me want to read Murder at the Mena House.  This is an historical mystery set in Egypt in 1926.  The author does a wonderful job with the setting, both in terms of the indolent, luxury hotel and the sites, including the pyramids, museums, camel races and more.  There are a variety of colorful characters and some interesting backstory for the majority of them.

I think that this is the author’s first published book.  I enjoyed this read although the mystery itself was the least engaging part for me.  I will read further adventures of Jane as they are published.  She was a good guide to Egypt and those around her.

Many thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for this title in exchange for an honest review.

A trailblazer worth knowing: The Story of Ruth Bader Ginsburg A Biography Book for New Readers by Susan B. Katz

Did you know that Ruth Bader Ginsberg’s first name is actually Joan?  Did you know that she was left handed and felt the injustice of being told that she had to become a righty…but she did not. These are just a couple of the interesting things that children will learn in this excellent beginning chapter book on the Supreme Court Justice.

The illustrations, charts and more in this book are vibrant and engaging.  They add to the text and help to keep a young reader’s attention and interest.

In addition to telling Ruth’s story, this book includes many extras.  There are definitions of words, questions to think about, family trees, quotes from RBG and even a quiz at the end so readers can see what they recall from the text.  There is also a helpful bibliography.

If you know a girl (or boy) that wants/needs to know that women can succeed and fight for what they believe in, encourage them to take a look at this book.  It belongs  in school libraries for elementary school children.

Many thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for this title in exchange for an honest review.  Even as an adult, I enjoyed reading this story and learning more about RBG.

Look into the life of Ruth:

ruth bader ginsburg childrens books, feminism, women, books for 8 year old girls, feminist

ruth bader ginsburg childrens books, feminism, women, books for 8 year old girls, feminist

ruth bader ginsburg childrens books, feminism, women, books for 8 year old girls, feminist

ruth bader ginsburg childrens books, feminism, women, books for 8 year old girls, feminist

Ruth worked hard from the start!

Ruth’s mom believed girls could—and should—study and work hard like boys. This early encouragement from her mother inspired her. Ruth would soon find that studying and working hard could change her entire life.

She fought to become a leader

In 1959, Ruth earned her law degree from Columbia Law School in New York City. Despite how hard law schools made it for women, Ruth came out on top. She didn’t give up on her dream of being a lawyer because she was living in a man’s world. Instead, she chose to change the world.

Ruth earned her role as a Supreme Court Justice

She’s now Justice Ginsburg. She became the second woman ever to sit on the Supreme Court, and she is the first Jewish woman to take on this role.

She continues to make the world a better place for everyone

Thanks to Ruth, a jury in a court is now made up of a group that represents your peers. Ruth argued that women should not be left out of juries, but she also argued that people of color should have jurors who reflect them, too. The goal of these changes was to make juries more fair, so they won’t decide someone is guilty (or innocent) just because of their gender or race.

ruth bader ginsburg childrens books, feminism, women, books for 8 year old girls, feminist

#TheStoryofRuthBaderGinsburg #NetGalley

A good way to start or end your day: You Belong Devotions & Prayers for an Uncertain Heart by Jessie Fioritto

This book is geared towards Christian readers but you do not have to be Christian to take in its messages of how to live life, ways to cope and acceptance.  There are short entries with something to think about in each.  If you would like to start or end your day thinking about the big issues (often manifested in small ways), this may be a title for you.

Many thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for this title in exchange for an honest review.

#YouBelong #NetGalley

Time to try: Beginner’s Baking Bible 130+ Recipes and Techniques for New Bakers by Heather Perine

This book looks like a terrific resource for those who would like to become better home bakers.  There are so many delicious recipes in this book but I will list just a few;  soft peanut butter cookies, pistachio cookies, pumpkin and white chocolate chip cookies, butterscotch blondies, pumpkin bars, raspberry jam bars, cranberry pear crumble pie, praline pumpkin pie, lemon meringue pie, blueberry muffins, coconut bread, snickerdoodle cupcakes, orange pound cake, buttermilk biscuits, shortcake biscuits and more.

The book starts with a helpful introduction that covers topics including what is needed in the kitchen, along with what might be nice to have but is not essential.  This is followed by explanations of terms such as folding, creaming, kneading and more.

The recipes themselves are clearly laid out and feel quite doable.  There are photos of techniques and some photos of the baked goods.

I am not a kitchen whiz so the fact that I feel that I could make some of these baked goods is high praise.  If you are more talented, there is still a plethora of recipes for you to try.

Many thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for this title in exchange for an honest review.

#BeginnersBakingBible #NetGalley